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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
as advances in military and defense technology. from last week, this runs just over an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome. my name is gideon and i'm the editor of foreign affairs and it is a wonderful privilege and honor and pleasure to be here again at the halifax from. foreign affairs is in the business of serious discussions by knowledgeable people with important issues, free and frank exchanges on the most important questions out there and that's actually the same business that halifax is and so we are delighted to be the media sponsor, and it is going to be fantastic weekend. let me just cut right to the chase. we have a fantastic panel, and more importantly, a great topic and a wonderful group with all of you as well and so let's get right to it. our panelists here, david singer of "the new york times," the former undersecretary deputy secretary of state for global affairs now a fellow at the center at harvard. the head of telefax holders distinguished sibling, the munich security conference where they have a great group. the point of the session is to do some big thinking on
american nation, the congress especially, has caved into this military worship of technology. i've seen that in the last 20 years grow. in the '90s and 2000s, we seem to give a pass always to the military. >> since i get over here about the military, it's almost impossible to criticize anyone in the military because there's such patriotism towards it, and i get that, but it is particularly pronounced in america, it is almost seen as utter disloyalty, if not treachery, to criticize any military man or woman. that's dangerous, isn't it? >> it leads back to rome. go back to the roman empire. the pretorian guard. emperors would pay homage and favors and pay them more money to be loyal to that faction. eventually, the roman guards, military, became more important than the citizenry. of course, they didn't hold up the empire. they are all over the place but they couldn't hold back the barbarians and so forth. it doesn't work. you don't bribe the military. and, frankly, we could be in a position where things get more chaotic and there could be another terrorist attack and this concept of ameri
are a proct of evolution. >> humans develop so many technologies, but always the hint or ideas are coming from human beings. are we going to use more robots and a robot will take a very important role in society. >> his robots recently appeared in a stage play in italy and in denmark they will join an experiment for the elderly. >>> many people living in japan along the sea of japan coast are experiencing stormy conditions. >> here in japan we are dealing with unstable conditions and upper cold air combined, making this nasty weather. fukui prefecture saw lots of hail and that was reported, so that will be persisting across similar regions all the way up towards northern japan on the sea of japan flank here. but also thunderstorms, frequent lightning, strong gusts. gusts of 75 kilometers r hour reported in niigata prefecture. on the pacific side as well, winds are going to be strong, picking up waves about 3 meters high. on top of that, really cold air is brought across much of the country and keeping things really chilly. this morning we saw very chilly weather. temperatures dropping down to
] super-weird! oh, is it febreze? yeah. ohh, how about that? febreze has anti-clogging technology that keeps it smelling fresh, even after 30 days. febreze. breathe happy. [ birds chirping ] are you sure you can fit in there? [ chuckles ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] around view monitor with bird's-eye view. nice work. [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new nissan pathfinder. it's our most innovative pathfinder ever. nissan. innovation that cites. ♪ >> sean: tonight, we are learning new details about the escalating violence between israel and gaza. earlier today, israel launched an airstrike against hamas military commander, jabari, who has long topped israel's most wanted list, after overseeing the abduction of an israeli soldier and plotting attacks against israelis. a former defense spokesman said this is the israeli equivalent of america's strike against bin laden. the islamist group saying that israel has opened up the gates of hell. earlier tonight, president obama spoke to israeli prime minister netanyahu, reiterating israel's right to self-defense. we have tony shaver
. ohh, how about that? febreze has anti-clogging technology that keeps it smelling fresh, even after 30 days. febreze. breathe happy. >> sean: as we focus on the political security implications of the petraeus issue, we are learning how much access the alleged misstress, paula broadwell had. the fbi raided her home and came out with boxes and boxes of evidence that is believed to include some of the classified information. we have learned that david petraeus has agreed to testify before congress in a closed hearing on friday. here with more, bill cunningham and michael brown. what is jure overall take on where this goes? >> i am sure, sean hannity, you would agree and michael brown would agree, this is a disastrous start to a second term. you have the cia director in a sex scandal. the commander of forces in afghanistan, sexting with a hot chick in tampa. rome is burning. the middle-east is in flames and obama is hold egg news conference with cupcakes thrown by magnolia bakery. how could this be worse for barack obama? how could it be any worse? michael, you explain to me. >> i imagine
be a light footprint with technological containment of the problem. when i hear $3.3 trillion, i hear the bulk of it is because of what happened on 9/11. my question is, in the new normal, what is the role for militant extremism? is it releasing them from jail and giving them a space and controlling them technologically? thank you. >> i will star with the last. if you think the light footprint strategy is all about containment, then it does raise the question of what are the limits of light footprint? what have we discovered it does not do terribly well? it does not build justice or build the kind of global development that paula was discussing before. it deliberately pulls the united states back from a kind of the engagement that we thought in the post-cold war world that we were heading into. and frankly, you might of thought we were heading into it just listening to president obama during the 2008 campaign when he talked mostly about engagement strategy. we did not hear a lot of discussion about what we have all been talking about here today. i think the fact that we have seen the
. if you talk to some very high technology firms, they will say, sorry, we cannot find enough specialized mathematician's or specialized engineers or an agricultural worker will say we have 7.9% unemployment but i cannot find enough people to help me take care of my harvest. we have 7.9% unemployment, but we do not have enough people in the transportation and logistics arena. perhaps high school kids -- high-school graduates do not want to be truckdrivers these days. they do not want to go back to the farm. it is not totally even. there is evidence that suggests very strongly that immigrants actually take up the slack. they do not compete necessarily with jobs already taken. another of many advantages of legalizing is that wages will have to go up. they will have to formally pay taxes, formally pays social security. the system will be level. there is one thing you said that i think at the core of this. i think it is and a wonderful insight. as the government is getting larger -- and the government is getting larger. the government has grown a four percentage points of gdp in the last four
and oranges to a certain extent. the drone, i think, as chris said is yes it's a new technology. relatively new technology. but it's used for an old purpose. that purpose is assassination. the question -- >> for me at least as a lawyer, how the legality of carrying out these assassinations. it's one thing to cite young awlaki but he was killed in a successful attempt to kill his father, also an american citizen. >> he was already -- >> two american citizens, for whom capital punishment was carried out. >> without due process. >> without due process. when a young man is killed in his bathroom in the bronx, you can hold people accountable. that's generally not due to an order from above or from the police chief. >> that was the story in the u.s. that was the thing that we had -- that we as a nation said this is unacceptable. >> let me say this. >> i'm sorry. this guy authorized the killing of other americans. it's treason. >> we're going to take a quick break. when we come back, a bit more on this question but also on the issue of benghazi. the potentiao more in business. by earning a degree
, driverless cars may be the thing of the future, but one car apparently could not wait for the new technology to evolve. >> take a look at this bizarre scene in wildwood, new jersey. the car keeps going in circles. backward with no one at all behind the wheel. after standing by helplessly, a hero emerges believed to be the fire chief jumping in from the passenger's side window. >> looks like the "dukes of hazard" car. little bit. lots of cheers from the crowd. it all started when drivers and passengers decided to switch side. as both men got out, the car slipped into reverse. >> well done. coming up next, the champagne blues. >> france's bubbly is going flat. we're going to tell you why and what it means for your new year's toast right after this. it's all coming up on "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now" weather, brought to you by lifestyle lift. hd3 >>> well, the new halo 4 game is proving to be an angel for microsoft. the sci-fi shoot-'em-up action game raked in $220 million sales globally last tuesday, the first day of sale. >> that beats the record set by previous installment
with technology, to keep up with equipment, to get the latest, to make sure that there itheir infrastructure is in place to serve the country. >> that's why i like it's a class action lawsuit instead of independent complaints. those happen as we know all the time. but a class action like this will get major media attention, will get us all talking about it, and if they prevail i'm hoping that other utility companies around the country will say, you know, we probably don't want to have the same thing happen to us as what happened on long island, let's make sure we do something right. rick: class action lawsuits play an important role in the legal system. don't they usually result in a big payday for the lawyers and not necessarily for the people who sign onto it? >> it's a two-step process. yes they've got to be certified as a class action. they have to make sure everybody is in the same class. i don't think there is a problem there you have everybody on long island suffering from the same thing. you're right, will the lawyer win 30, 40%, yes, okay, that is not great, but let me explain a cla
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)